SRock and roll memorabilia: from Jimi Hendrix’s burned-up Stratocaster to John Lennon’s wooden spoon, it seems there’s no end to the list of trinkets, baubles, or other miscellany that fans will cut a check for.

SYet by far, it has to be Elvis Presley’s stuff that fetches the highest in the land. Why, just last year, a pair of his dirty chonies went up for auction, with a reserve set at $10,000. It failed to sell, but the bidding did reach $7,500, amazingly.

It just goes to show that in order to own a piece of the King’s treasure, no matter its condition or utility, one must pay a hefty premium. And this 1968 Eldorado is no exception.

Reportedly, this two-ton-plus luxury car was first purchased by Elvis back in 1967, and was used for around a year until one day when it wouldn’t start. And naturally, when your stallion can no longer perform its duty, you’ve got to put it down. So Elvis did the proper thing and shot the 472 cu-in engine through the right front fender.

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It didn’t kill the car, but it likely didn’t get it back in running order either. Instead, the car traded hands to Priscilla’s stepfather, then crossed the Pacific to settle in Australia for a while, then sailed back to wind up in Missouri, and finally came to its current home in Saint Ann, some 200 miles east of Kansas City.

Screen Shot 2013-09-13 at 2.33.41 PM copyAnd now it can be yours for the price of just $229,900. As part of the auction now listed on eBay on item no. 390656095318, the car comes with a copy of the original registration and, get this, an animatronic Elvis who tells the story of the car. If that doesn’t seal the deal for you, then we don’t know what else to say.

One burning question we have is what became of the slug that punched through the car. Given Elvis’ penchant for blasting random objects, that thing alone has to be worth a couple thousand. Think of it as a rebate, only it’s one that happens to be lodged somewhere in the engine bay.

For this kind of money, does this car have you all shook up? Or is it destined to be returned to sender? Share your two cents below.