Fancy paint jobs draw crowds. At least that’s the conclusion I came to a few years ago when my LT1 Trans Am started pulling people from across parking lots with nothing other than stock parts under the hood. But in going to automotive events, racing for numbers on the track and starting your build project, you come to realize that paint isn’t everything. In fact, I envy the folks who have built hot rods or classics that don’t have to worry about parking 10 miles from the entrance of a store just to avoid door dings, scratches or impromptu battles with shopping carts. Of course, I’m talking about the guys and gals that wear their vehicles’ beat up patinas with pride. Sam Castronova is such a guy.

Recently featured on Stance Works, Castronova’s ‘65 Chevy C-10 pickup is a beauty, the weathered patina drawing you in and the goodies underneath keeping you engrossed like a child who’s just gotten a new toy but prefers the box instead. Castronova’s truck is the work of a master.

Built as a personal project by Del Ushenko from Burbank, California’s Old Crow Speed Shop, the truck sits atop a Porterbuilt Dropmember kit in both the front and the rear, making use of air bags from Slam Specialties regulated by a York compressor.

It is these additions plus an AccuAir e-level kit that allow for the truck’s ground-level view. Ushenko chose a set of 22-inch Centerline wheels to hang on all four corners and even managed to devise a nifty method for attaching the original Chevy hubcaps with powdered centers for that OEM plus look.

Of course, for power Ushenko relied on none other than the venerable small-block 350ci. With over a million small-blocks made, sourcing parts won’t ever become an issue. For shifting duties, Ushenko dropped in an overdrive 700R4 transmission; making dragging the rear bumper in the fast lane a reality.

Down in the cockpit, although improvements and customizations were made, the truck maintained its worn aesthetics, right down to the torn bench seat. How cool is that?

After Ushenko finished the build, Castronova spotted it online, contacted Ushenko and worked out a deal to buy the truck. Looking to make it his own, Ushenko made a few adjustments to the project once it was in his hands. In addition to replacing the rear bumper with a custom shaved unit, Castronova had some new chrome laid on some components.

Castronova's C-10 may be modified, but sitting at stock ride level, you'd never have a clue.

Other than that, the truck remains how Ushenko built it- modified but with the look and feel that it was never touched. It also apparently joins a ‘59 worn-patina truck boasting an LS conversion under the hood. The talk is that the ‘65 may also see an LS in the future, but chances are, you won’t ever know it just by looking at the truck.

For more amazing photos by Kevin Whipps of this beautiful C-10, visit StanceWorks.com.