You’re heard the phrase “all show and no go.” Well, this ‘72 Nova is exactly the opposite of that- the epitome of a sleeper in all actuality. While it may not look like much more than a factory-built Chevy, this Nova is actually a full-fledged supercar. How is that possible? Well, with a twin supercharger setup under the hood, this bad boy is cranking out nearly 1,200hp and is still street-legal. Check it out in the latest episode of Big Muscle above.

If this Nova looks familiar, that’s because it made it into the pages of Hot Rod back in 2009. Now owned by Dru Diesner, the car maintains its stealthy reputation, and for good reason.

One look at the expertly concealed roll cage behind the B-pillars and roofline, and you know there’s just a little something different about this car.

Built by Kurt Urban from Wheel to Wheel Powertrain to appear like a complete underdog, this Nova has more than a few tricks up its sleeve. If you can get past the original green patina, stock 7-inch front wheels, western blanket interior and character-adding dents, you’ll find a fully built LS2 long-block engine boosted by twin Rotrex superchargers under the hood. Backed by two liquid-to-air intercoolers in the fenders and a tank for water in the trunk, this system cranks out an astonishing 1,160hp punch to the wheels and 825ft-lb of torque harnessed by a run-of-the-mill Powerglide transmission. However, the Nova’s surprises don’t end there.

The car also makes use of an innovative fueling system, or two rather, created by Wheel to Wheel Powertrain called Octane on Demand. With this system, the Nova can be driven on regular street gas with a boost of race fuel if conditions allow. The factory fuel tank is maintained on the car, while a racing fuel cell sits in the trunk, feeding the LS2 high-octane juice through a second set of injectors once the duty cycle of the primary injectors reaches 70 percent.

This allows Diesner to drive the car to and from the grocery store while reserving a secret stash of power for those “just don’t get caught” moments. We’re pretty sure that handy fuel system also has something to do with the Nova’s 9-second quarter mile capabilities.

This car is downright sick and would definitely make believers out of those with less than favorable impressions of the standard 70s Novas. The only thing this car needs is plenty of wide open road to make it happen.